by Amelia Gilmer | | Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 09:52


Gilmer

Greetings from Richmond National Battlefield Park!

Despite the massive number of bugs, sweltering heat, and possible ghosts, working for the Richmond National Battlefield Park has been an absolute dream. As the Nau Center’s summer intern at the park, I primarily work at two of our thirteen sites: our main visitor center at Historic Tredegar and at the Cold Harbor Battlefield. Additionally, I spend two days a week working on my research project, which focuses on Virginia women during the secession crisis and subsequent convention.

by Amelia Gilmer | | Monday, June 19, 2017 - 13:32


Unknown Black Sailor

Out of the approximately 18,000 African American sailors who served in the Union navy during the Civil War, over 2,800 were born in Virginia, the most from any state. While most of the men in our Black Virginians in Blue project were soldiers in the USCT, six served as sailors aboard five Union vessels.

by Sarah Anderson | | Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 00:00


4/8/2020: Project Director William Kurtz has updated this blog entry to reflect the project’s latest findings.

by Gary W. Gallagher | | Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 00:00


VMI Ruins 1864

This last of three installments on the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil War shifts to civilians. The frequent presence of United States forces in the Valley exposed civilians to significant disruption of normal routines.

by Gary W. Gallagher | | Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 00:00


Sheridan, Harper's Weekly

This second of three installments on the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil War, which as a group anticipate our Signature Conference for 2017, focuses on military action. From the confrontation between Joseph E. Johnston and Robert Patterson during the campaign of First Bull Run through the Confederate defeat at Waynesboro on March 2, 1865, almost continuous activity of some sort disturbed the Valley’s pastoral countryside.

by Gary W. Gallagher | | Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 14:28


Battle of Kernstown

The Nau Center’s Signature Conference for 2017 will focus on the Shenandoah Valley’s role in the Civil War. Lecturers will examine various facets of the overall topic, including military operations, civilian experiences, how events in the Valley resonated in the United States and the Confederacy, and how the Valley figured in memories of the conflict. In this, the first of three installments anticipating the conference, I will examine the Valley's geography and logistical and strategic significance.

by Jack Furniss & William Kurtz | | Tuesday, February 7, 2017 - 00:00


July 1862 Prison Returns

The Nau Center is in the very early stages of a digital project looking to add to what historians know about military prisons in the Union and the Confederacy.

by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 00:00


Slave Compensation Claim

Note:  This is the last installment of a three-part blog post on the Virginia roots of U.S.C.T. soldiers in Missouri regiments.

 

Part III:  The War’s Aftermath

by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 00:00


Camp Morganza

Note:  This is part two of a three part blog post on the Virginia roots of U.S.C.T. soldiers in Missouri regiments.

 

Part II:  Military Service

by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 13:04


Benton Barrack Soldier

Note:  What follows is a three part story, which we will present in consecutive blog posts, that permits us to see the history of central Virginia in a new way:  with a focus on the journeys of African American men, born in the shadow of Jefferson’s Monticello, who fought for the Union army in the Civil War.  These men represent the Virginia roots of thousands of U.S.C.T. soldiers, men who were dispersed by the system of slavery and then converged, during the war, in black regiments, and fought to save the Union and to end slavery.

 

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