by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 00:00


Note:  This is the last installment of a three-part blog post on the Virginia roots of U.S.C.T. soldiers in Missouri regiments.

 

Part III:  The War’s Aftermath

by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 00:00


Note:  This is part two of a three part blog post on the Virginia roots of U.S.C.T. soldiers in Missouri regiments.

 

Part II:  Military Service

by Elizabeth R. Varon | | Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 13:04


Note:  What follows is a three part story, which we will present in consecutive blog posts, that permits us to see the history of central Virginia in a new way:  with a focus on the journeys of African American men, born in the shadow of Jefferson’s Monticello, who fought for the Union army in the Civil War.  These men represent the Virginia roots of thousands of U.S.C.T. soldiers, men who were dispersed by the system of slavery and then converged, during the war, in black regiments, and fought to save the Union and to end slavery.

 

by William Kurtz | | Tuesday, January 3, 2017 - 00:00


This blog post is one of several that we will publish in 2017 on our Black Virginians in Blue digital project. The project explores the lives of African American men from Albemarle County, Virginia, who served in the USCT. Jonathan White’s piece on James T. S. Taylor was our first blog entry on the subject.

 

by Peter C. Luebke | | Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 12:53


Historians have neglected what regimental histories can reveal about the experience of common soldiers during the Civil War. Many in number, regimental histories provide an accurate portrait of the life of the Union soldier during the conflict and also comment on why soldiers went to war.